Featured Research

Find out what our faculty members are researching and how they are impacting Canada's legal system.

Emily Laidlaw

Emily researches at the nexus of three fields of study: technology regulation, corporate social responsibility and information governance.

The role of technology businesses in shaping the legal landscape

Professor Emily Laidlaw researches in the area of technology law, including internet regulation, cybersecurity, copyright, media law, human rights and corporate social responsibility. The primary theme of her scholarship is investigation of the role of technology businesses in shaping the legal and policy landscape. In particular, she researches at the nexus of three fields of study: technology regulation, corporate social responsibility and information governance. Her research on the subject is extensive, ranging from the role of businesses as intermediaries between users and the state (in areas like human rights, defamation and privacy), the regulatory role of businesses in resolving online disputes, the implications of public/private governance structures for information security, and the human rights responsibilities of businesses. Recent publications include her book, Regulating Speech in Cyberspace: Gatekeepers, Human Rights and Corporate Responsibility (Cambridge University Press, 2015), two commissioned papers on reforming intermediary liability (with co-author Hilary Young) and re-imaging dispute resolution in defamation, and an article, “Online Shaming and the Right to Privacy” 2017, 6(1) Laws, 3. Emily is also an advisor to the Law Commission of Ontario on its project defamation law in the internet age and a member of the Institute for Security, Privacy and Information Assurance.

Emily is currently working on four projects. First, she is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council for a four-year project on online abuse, examining development of the tort of privacy. Second, she is co-leading a project with Dr. Hilary Young, University of New Brunswick, for the Uniform Law Conference of Canada on reforming the tort of non-consensual distribution of intimate images. Third, she is working on an interdisciplinary project investigating data analytics, examining the policy and legal implications of corporate surveillance and re-identification. Fourth, she is working on an interdisciplinary project examining the core role of intermediaries in information governance and the impact on security issues.